Showing posts with label USTA. Show all posts

THE PHILADELPHIA TRIBUNE: West Philadelphia Native Frank Adams To Be Inducted Into The Black Tennis Hall Of Fame

 Writer/Credits:  Mr. Donald Hunt / dhunt@phillytrib.com

 

Frank Adams, who grew up playing tennis in West Philadelphia, will be inducted into the Black Tennis Hall of Fame. Adams will be enshrined as a regional legend at the annual induction ceremony for the Classes of 2020 and 2021 July 2-3. The ceremony will take place at the Sportsmen’s Tennis & Enrichment Center in Dorchester, Mass. 

 

Adams, who was the first African American President of the Colorado Tennis Association, and Intermountain Tennis Association USTA Section, paving the way for Colorado and section leaders. As chair of the Colorado and ITA Minority Participation Committee, he recruited and mentored African Americans to volunteer for the USTA Committees. 

 

Adams knows the value of getting volunteers involved in the game as well as playing tennis on the grassroots level. That’s here his career took off as a player.

 

“I look at it as part of a journey that helped me along,” said Adams, a St. Joseph’s Prep alumnus. “I couldn’t have arrived at this point without all the mentors that helped me out from the times I first started playing tennis.

Black Tennis Hall of Fame Congratulates Its Founder, Dr. Dale G. Caldwell As He Is Announced As An Inductee Into The Eastern Tennis Hall of Fame Class of 2021

Tennis Historian, founder of the Black Tennis Hall of Fame, creator and co-curator of the original Breaking the Barriers Exhibit, now hosted at the International Tennis Hall of Fame, and former USTA Eastern President.

Dale Caldwell is the first of this year's six inductees into the Eastern Tennis Hall of Fame to be announced. A new inductee will be announced each week. 


A graduate of Princeton University, Dale has tirelessly promoted the history of Black Tennis in the US. He founded the Black Tennis Hall of Fame, and in 2006, he conceived and conjured Breaking the Barriers – currently on exhibition at the International Tennis Hall of Fame – honoring the American Tennis Association and the Black pioneers of tennis.

 

Along with fellow Hall of Famer Nancy Gill McShea, Dale is the author of Tennis in New York, the History of the Most Influential Sport in the Most Influential City in the World. He has served on the Board of Directors of the USTA and was the first Black president of USTA Eastern.

 

BLACK TENNIS HALL OF FAME PIONEER VIRGINIA M. GLASS HAS DIED


Virginia M. Glass was inducted into the Black Tennis Hall of Fame with the class of 2013 that also included John Harding Lucas, II, Bessie Stockard, Sydney Llewellyn, James "Jimmy" Smith, and Lucille Freeman.

In 1991, Glass made history by becoming the first female president of the American Tennis Association (ATA). She served as president for two two-year terms. In addition, Glass was the first woman of color to serve on the USTA executive committee. In 1969, she co-founded the Mountain View Tennis Club in San Diego, CA and was one of the original founders of the San Diego District Tennis Association. Glass’ long service with this influential organization included serving as president and at-large board member. She was also one of the original founders of the San Diego Umpires Association and served as a West Coast editor for Black Tennis Magazine. In 1988, Glass won the Women’s 60-and-over division of the International Tennis Federation Veterans Championship. In 2008, Glass received the “Lifetime Achievement Award” from the Southern California Tennis Association (SCTA) for her work with local tennis organizations and Community Development.

Glass served on the ATA’s junior development committee and as a board member of the Black Tennis & Sports Foundation. Over the last 70 plus years, she has volunteered at virtually every level of organized tennis both in the ATA and the USTA. In addition to her volunteer work, Glass was a very successful tennis parent who is the proud mother of Sidney and Luis Glass who were top junior players in the USTA Eastern Section. Sidney Glass played tennis at the University of Wisconsin and Luis Glass went on to be an All-American tennis player at UCLA. In 2010, Glass was inducted into the San Diego Tennis Hall of Fame.

Glass traveled an incredible road in life — from spending three years in World War II concentration camps in her native Philippines, where she lost her father and two sisters — to living in “America’s Finest City.”

Along the way, Glass developed a passion for tennis in all aspects — playing, coaching, running tournaments and working with many organizations associated with the sport.

“Being elected is an acknowledgement and recognition of the efforts I have made to opening up tennis to minorities.

“Our main emphasis with the club has always been on the development of junior players. The National Junior Tennis League (NJTL), inspired by the late tennis great Arthur Ashe, has been a huge help to our efforts.”

Ms. Glass died on Thursday, April 16th.




A Major Event For The Preservation And Rememberance Of The Life And Contributions Of American Tennis Great Althea Gibson At 2019 U.S. Open

Althea Gibson Monument Unveiled On Day One of 2019 U.S. Open

The historic occasion of  the Althea Gibson Statue Unveiling on Monday, August 26, 2019, the first day of the U.S. Open, raised so many different levels of thoughts and feelings.  The day was beautiful, the weather was good and the crowd was large, we were about to witness a tremendous turn around in the consistent lack of preservation and honor that Ms. Gibson has long deserved.

The greatness that Ms. Gibson brought to the Black community, the tennis world and America should have already afforded her legacy the dignity and respect that many who have done far less have already received.

This incredible Black woman was the first to break the color barrier of the United States Lawn Tennis Association (USLTA) in 1950, and played in the U. S. National Tennis Championships in Forest Hills. She became the first African-American player to play in Wimbledon in 1951. She won the French Open Championship in 1956. Ms. Gibson won the U.S. National Championships and Wimbledon in 1957 and 1958. These victories were especially historic because the winner’s trophy was presented to her by Queen Elizabeth.

Ms. Gibson also broke the color barrier in golf, launching her golf career in 1964 and joining the
Ladies Professional Golf Association (LPGA).

On the day of the Unveiling, Immediate Past United States Tennis Association (USTA) President Katrina Adams, and former tennis professionals Leslie Allen and Zina Garrison, all gave tribute to, and discussed the depth of what Ms. Gibson meant to them and the role that her mentorship played in their becoming successful players. Witnessing these Black women honor the fact that had there been no Althea Gibson, they would not be where they are today, paid well deserved, respectful and loving tribute to yet another history making and door opening Black American woman.

American tennis great Billie Jean King, Angela Buxton, Ms. Gibson's former doubles partner, and the creator of the monument, Eric Goulder, also discussed and paid wonderful tribute to Ms. Gibson. Of particular note was Mr. Goulder's detailing of his concept in creating the monument.  During an interview he talked about, "The bust portion sitting atop a box, the box representing the box that the world tried to keep her in, and her now sitting atop that box she is depicted having broken out of it." And that, "Her shoulder is especially depicted in the way that it is, because so many now stand on it."

Talking to Mr. Goulder brought so much more conceptual meaning to his work. Upon returning to the statue, I now saw it in a totally different light, and was also spiritually enlightened by it.

Ms. Buxton, shared memories of her long-time friend.  “We won both the French and Wimbledon doubles together with my arm around her both times at the closing ceremonies,” noted Gibson’s former doubles partner Angela Buxton during the ceremony. “she slowly became the Jackie Robinson of tennis and I was soon referred to as the Pee Wee Reese, who without saying a word indicated, “This is my friend.”

The sculpture also will activate an augmented reality experience. Developed by MRM/McCann, visitors will be able to activate exclusive content about Althea Gibson’s life and legacy by focusing the Augmented Reality (AR) Viewfinder found within the 2019 US Open app onto the sculpture.  Narrated by Billie Jean King, the additional AR experience traces Althea’s humble roots, her early interest and involvement in tennis, her career and her legacy through video footage, photos and graphics.  Fans can also view the AR experience anywhere by using the APP to place a full-size 3D “hologram” of the sculpture into their surroundings and re-live the experience again or for the very first time.component that brings Gibson's life and career to life for fans on site during the Open via the US Open mobile app.

This honor that the USTA has bestowed upon Ms. Gibson shines such a brighter light on the historic and current day value of the life of Althea Gibson. Later in the day, I stood and watched people of many different cultures stop and observe the monument, take photos in front of it or standing beside it, and reading her quote that is engraved on one of the surrounding granite blocks, "I hope that I have accomplished just one thing: that I have been a credit to tennis and my country.

SAVE THE DATE!! 2019 US Open Althea Gibson Statue Unveiling Hosted By Katrina Adams

Hall of Famer D. A. Abrams Shares The Origin Of His Love Of Tennis


Black Tennis Hall Of Fame And Partner Black History Museum & Culture Center Of Virginia Enjoy Live Jazz At Freedom Friday Event With Surprise Visit From Jazz Great James "Plunky" Branch

Black Tennis Hall of Fame Executive Director Shelia Curry and world renowned Jazz great James "Plunky" Branch.

On Friday evening, June 7, 2019, the Black History Museum and Culture Center of Virginia (BHMVA) held their monthly Freedom Friday Live Jazz event, which occurs on the first Friday of each month. Admission is free, you have the opportunity to view the museum's exhibitions, be a part of special activities and entertainment, as well as enjoy good food and beverages. 

Executive Directors Shelia Curry(L) and Adele Johnson(R)
Adele Johnson, who was appointed Executive Director of the BHMVA this year on January 1, is working in such an incredible way to not only preserve Black history and tell our stories, but also to incorporate present day communities inside of historic events utilizing new methodologies. One of those new ways is Freedom Friday.

At the event you enjoy live Jazz programmed by Richmond Jazz Society featuring some of the area's most popular artists with up-and-coming young lions making a name on the Jazz scene.

Michael Hawkins (L) and Ayinde Williams (R)
Last night's event showcased Michael Hawkins, one of Virginia’s premier bassists who has toured the U.S. with internationally acclaimed pianist Cyrus Chestnut. Hawkins performs straight-ahead and contemporary Jazz as an accompanist and, as leader of his own ensembles.  Performing alongside Hawkins was a young and accomplished pianist, Ayinde Williams who has attended the Manhattan School of Music and Virginia Commonwealth University.

The two musicians played current and classic music that set the room on fire, put all of us jazz lovers in that very cool "jazzy mood" and took us to musical places that we had not been in awhile. They were absolutely fantastic. 

The great surprise of the evening was the presence of world renowned and Richmond, Virginia hometown favorite James "Plunky" Branch!  Mr. Branch is a jazz artist whose music has traveled the world and is a favorite therein.  Even though the famed jazz musician did not take the stage, the audience was no less delighted to have him within our midst.

As we were talking, Mr. Branch shared with me that he is a Richmond Tennisbum team member and that he loves playing tennis... who knew!  He also shared with me that he had been playing tennis at 7:30am on Friday morning, and that the Richmond Tennisbums had topped their age division in the United States Tennis Association (USTA) and gone to the nationals.  An article on the 11-member team was posted in the Richmond Free Press.

What a night. A great evening was had by all, and every chance that I get on the first Friday of each month, I'll be headed back to Freedom Friday.
 

12th Annual Black Tennis Hall Of Fame Induction Ceremony


Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...