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CONGRATULATIONS BLACK TENNIS HALL OF FAME CLASS OF 2021!!

 **With Great Honor, We Welcome Each Of You**

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Click on the introductory photo above to reach the bios of each of our 2021 inductees and be enlightened by their accomplishments!

MERRY CHRISTMAS!! Stay Blessed And Safe!

WE WISH A BLESSED, SAFE, AND HAPPY THANKSGIVING TO EACH AND EVERY FAMILY!!

Inducted As A Contributor Into The Black Tennis Hall Of Fame Class Of 2012, The First And Only Black Mayor Of New York City, David N. Dinkins, Dies One Month After His Wife, Former First Lady Joyce Dinkins

In this Monday, Jan. 2, 1990, file photo, David Dinkins delivers his first speech as mayor of New York, in New York. Dinkins, New York City’s first African-American mayor, died Monday, Nov. 23, 2020. He was 93. (AP Photo/Frankie Ziths, File)n

NEW YORK (AP) — David Dinkins, who broke barriers as New York City’s first African-American mayor, but was doomed to a single term by a soaring murder rate, stubborn unemployment and his mishandling of a race riot in Brooklyn, has died. He was 93. 

Dinkins died Monday, the New York City Police Department confirmed. The department said officers were called to the former mayor’s home this evening. Initial indications were that he died of natural causes. 

Dinkins, a calm and courtly figure with a penchant for tennis and formal wear, was a dramatic shift from both his predecessor, Ed Koch, and his successor, Rudolph Giuliani — two combative and often abrasive politicians in a city with a world-class reputation for impatience and rudeness. 

In his inaugural address, he spoke lovingly of New York as a “gorgeous mosaic of race and religious faith, of national origin and sexual orientation, of individuals whose families arrived yesterday and generations ago, coming through Ellis Island or Kennedy Airport or on buses bound for the Port Authority.”

But the city he inherited had an ugly side, too. 

AIDS, guns and crack cocaine killed thousands of people each year. Unemployment soared. Homelessness was rampant. The city faced a $1.5 billion budget deficit. 

Dinkins’ low-key, considered approach quickly came to be perceived as a flaw. Critics said he was too soft and too slow. 

“Dave, Do Something!” screamed one New York Post headline in 1990, Dinkins’ first year in office.

Dinkins did a lot at City Hall. He raised taxes to hire thousands of police officers. He spent billions of dollars revitalizing neglected housing. His administration got the Walt Disney Corp. to invest in the cleanup of then-seedy Times Square. 

In recent years, he’s gotten more credit for those accomplishments — credit that Mayor Bill de Blasio said he should have always had. De Blasio, who worked in Dinkins’ administration, named Manhattan’s Municipal Building after the former mayor in October 2015. 

Results from those accomplishments, however, didn’t come fast enough to earn Dinkins a second term.

After beating Giuliani by only by 47,000 votes out of 1.75 million cast in 1989, Dinkins lost a rematch by roughly the same margin in 1993. 

Political historians often trace the defeat to Dinkins’ handling of the Crown Heights riots in Brooklyn in 1991. 

The violence began after a black 7-year-old boy was accidentally killed by a car in the motorcade of an Orthodox Jewish religious leader. During the three days of anti-Jewish rioting by young black men that followed, a rabbinical student was fatally stabbed. Nearly 190 people were hurt. 

A state report issued in 1993, an election year, cleared Dinkins of the persistently repeated charge that he intentionally held back police in the first days of the violence, but criticized him for not stepping up as a leader. 

In a 2013 memoir, Dinkins accused the police department of letting the disturbance get out of hand, and also took a share of the blame, on the grounds that “the buck stopped with me.” But he bitterly blamed his election defeat on prejudice: “I think it was just racism, pure and simple.” 

Born in Trenton, New Jersey, on July 10, 1927, Dinkins moved with his mother to Harlem when his parents divorced, but returned to his hometown to attend high school. There, he learned an early lesson in discrimination: Blacks were not allowed to use the school swimming pool. 

During a hitch in the Marine Corps as a young man, a Southern bus driver barred him from boarding a segregated bus because the section for blacks was filled. “And I was in my country’s uniform!” Dinkins recounted years later. While attending Howard University, the historically black university in Washington, D.C., Dinkins said he gained admission to segregated movie theaters by wearing a turban and faking a foreign accent.Back in New York with a degree in mathematics, Dinkins married his college sweetheart, Joyce Burrows, in 1953. His father-in-law, a power in local Democratic politics, channeled Dinkins into a Harlem political club. Dinkins paid his dues as a Democratic functionary while earning a law degree from Brooklyn Law School, and then went into private practice. 

He got elected to the state Assembly in 1965, became the first black president of the city’s Board of Elections in 1972 and went on to serve as Manhattan borough president. 

Dinkins’ election as mayor in 1989 came after two racially charged cases that took place under Koch: the rape of a white jogger in Central Park and the bias murder of a black teenager in Bensonhurst.

Dinkins defeated Koch, 50 percent to 42 percent, in the Democratic primary. But in a city where party registration was 5-to-1 Democratic, Dinkins barely scraped by the Republican Giuliani in the general election, capturing only 30 percent of the white vote. 

His administration had one early high note: Newly freed Nelson Mandela made New York City his first stop in the U.S. in 1990. Dinkins had been a longtime, outspoken critic of apartheid in South Africa. 

In that same year, though, Dinkins was criticized for his handling of a black-led boycott of Korean-operated grocery stores in Brooklyn. Critics contended Dinkins waited too long to intervene. He ultimately ended up crossing the boycott line to shop at the stores — but only after Koch did. 

During Dinkins’ tenure, the city’s finances were in rough shape because of a recession that cost New York 357,000 private-sector jobs in his first three years in office. 

Meanwhile, the city’s murder toll soared to an all-time high, with a record 2,245 homicides during his first year as mayor. There were 8,340 New Yorkers killed during the Dinkins administration — the bloodiest four-year stretch since the New York Police Department began keeping statistics in 1963. 

In the last years of his administration, record-high homicides began a decline that continued for decades. In the first year of the Giuliani administration, murders fell from 1,946 to 1,561. 

One of Dinkins’ last acts in 1993 was to sign an agreement with the United States Tennis Association that gave the organization a 99-year lease on city land in Queens in return for building a tennis complex. That deal guaranteed that the U.S. Open would remain in New York City for decades. 

After leaving office, Dinkins was a professor at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. 

He had a pacemaker inserted in August 2008, and underwent an emergency appendectomy in October 2007. He also was hospitalized in March 1992 for a bacterial infection that stemmed from an abscess on the wall of his large intestine. He was treated with antibiotics and recovered in a week. Dinkins is survived by his son, David Jr.; and daughter, Donna and two grandchildren. His wife, Joyce, died in October at the age of 89. 

Associated Press writer David Ca in New York contributed to this report.

 

 

BLACK WALL STREET: The Past, Present And Future Of Black Excellence


 

Black Tennis Hall Of Fame Sends Condolences To Its Founder, Dr. Dale G. Caldwell, Upon The Death Of His Father, Reverend Dr. Gilbert Haven Caldwell, Jr., A Family Man, Minister, And Civil Rights Foot Soldier (Video)

The Rev. Dr. Gilbert H. Caldwell first met Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1958 while he was a student at Boston University. He actively participated in the 1963 March on Washington, the 1964 Mississippi Freedom Summer, the 1965 Selma to Montgomery March, and the March in Boston protesting public school segregation, 1968 Poor People's Campaign. 

Dr. Caldwell was a graduate of North Carolina A. & T. State University and Boston University School of Theology. He received an Honorary Doctor of Divinity, D.D. degree, Dakota Wesleyan University, Mitchell, South Dakota. 

He was a retired United Methodist Church minister who has pastored churches in Boston, New Haven, Brooklyn, Harlem, Chester, Pennsylvania and Denver, Colorado. Dr. Caldwell has been a United Methodist Church District Superintendent in Boston and West Chester, Pennsylvania. 

As recently as June 7th, Dr. Caldwell spoke at a Black Lives Matter rally in Willingboro.  Dr. Caldwell stated that, “Our country is on the verge of dying if, in fact, it doesn’t stand up and become more just."

HALL OF FAMER ANGELA BUXTON HAS DIED AT 85

British tennis player Angela Buxton, left, and doubles partner Althea Gibson, right, are presented with the trophy for the 1956 Wimbledon Women's Doubles title by The Duchess of Kent.

In 1956, Angela Buxton made history by winning the French Woman’s Doubles Championship with Althea Gibson. She therefore played an important role in helping Althea Gibson become the first African American to win a Grand Slam tournament doubles championship. Buxton and Gibson went on to win the Wimbledon Women’s Doubles Championship that year as well. In 1953 and 1957, she won the Women’s Singles title at the Maccabiah Games for Jewish athletes. People of Jewish descent were not admitted to the All England Lawn Tennis Club where Wimbledon was played until 1952. In addition, they faced discrimination on the world tennis tour. The racism that Gibson experienced and the anti-Semitism that Buxton experienced brought them together on the tennis tour. When they won the Wimbledon Women’s Doubles Championship one British newspaper used the unfortunate headline “Minorities Win” to call attention to their victory.

Buxton was an excellent singles player who reached the 1956 Wimbledon Women’s Finals. Prior to that accomplishment, she won the English Indoor title, the London Grass Court singles championships and the English Hard Court Doubles title with Darlene Hard. She reached the semi-finals of the Women’s Singles division of French Championships in 1956 (the same year she and Gibson won the Women’s Doubles Championship). 

 

Black Tennis Hall of Fame inducted Ms. Buxton in 2015, and the International Jewish Sports Hall in Israel in 1981, as shared by The Jerusalem Post.


Ms. Buxton is accompanied by Billie Jean King.

On Monday, August 26, 2019, the first day of the U.S. Open and the historic occasion of the Althea Gibson Statue Unveiling, Ms. Buxton, shared memories of her long-time friend.  “We won both the French and Wimbledon doubles together with my arm around her both times at the closing ceremonies.”  “She slowly became the Jackie Robinson of tennis and I was soon referred to as the Pee Wee Reese, who without saying a word indicated, “This is my friend.” 

Ms. Buxton, seated far right, shared moments of her career and friendship with Althea Gibson.


AFTER ACHIEVING A CENTURY OF LIFE, AND A LIFE FILLED WITH ACHIEVEMENTS, THE FIRST BLACK TENNIS PROFESSIONAL IN THE UNITED STATES HAS DIED. BLACK TENNIS HALL OF FAME MOURNS THE LOSS, AND CELEBRATES THE LIFE OF HALL OF FAMER ROBERT RYLAND JUNE 16, 1920 - AUGUST 2, 2020



In 1959, Ryland broke through barriers of race and class by becoming the first African American to become a tennis professional. His success in both American Tennis Association (ATA) and integrated amateur tournaments around the country made him one of the best known Black players in the US. His fame led sports promoter Jack Marsh to ask Ryland to make history by joining his professional tennis circuit which included legendary tennis players Pancho Gonzalez (who was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame (ITHF) in 1968), Lew Hoad (ITHF Inductee in 1990) and other top pro players. Ryland accepted, and another barrier of race and class was broken when he played his first pro match in Cleveland in 1959. Ryland started playing tennis at age nine. He was taught by his father and the iconic Mrs. C.O. “Mother” Seames (one of the first nationally known black tennis coaches) of the Chicago Prairie Tennis Club in Chicago, Illinois. Ryland had a talent for the sport and quickly rose to stardom by winning the Illinois State High School Championship in 1939, beating Jimmy Evert (Chris Evert’s father) on the way to the title. In addition, in 1939, he won the ATA Boys 18 and under Singles Championship. In 1944, he played in a historic exhibition tennis match at the Cosmopolitan Club with legendary player Alice Marble (1964 ITHF Inductee) against Dr. Reginald Weir and Mary Hardwick. Ryland and Marble won the match 10-8. In 1946, he won the Men’s Singles Championship in the Detroit Public Parks integrated tournament. In 1947, he lost to the number one ranked U.S. player Ham Richardson 4-6, 5-7 in the Pacific Southwest Championship. In 1952, he won the integrated Los Angeles Industrial City Championships. In 1955 and 1956 he won the ATA Men’s Singles Championship in addition to being a finalist four other times.


Playing for Wayne State University, Ryland was the first Black man to play in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) tournament, advancing to the quarterfinals in 1946. Ryland was so admired in the Black tennis community that a 14-year-old Arthur Ashe said his only dream was “to be good enough to beat Bob Ryland.” In 1955, Ryland received a nomination by the ATA to play in the USLTA Nationals at Forest Hills. At the age of 35, with no experience on grass, he lost in straight sets in the first round. Clearly, Ryland might have done well in the US Nationals if he had been allowed to play it in the prime of his tennis career. In the 1960’s, he worked briefly at the St. Albans Tennis Club in Washington, DC where he gave tennis lessons to some of Washington’s elite. He later coached Venus and Serena Williams when they were juniors, and touring pros Harold Solomon and Leslie Allen. In addition, he taught tennis to many celebrities including Bill Cosby, Dustin Hoffman, Barbara Streisand and Tony Bennett.

EIGHTY YEARS OF HISTORIC RIGHTEOUSNESS - LEGENDARY CONGRESSMAN AND CIVIL RIGHTS LEADER JOHN LEWIS DIES - FEBRUARY 21, 1940 - JULY 17, 2020


2020 CELEBRATION OF LIFE FOR HALL OF FAMER AND FRIEND, ARTHUR ASHE JULY 10, 1943 - FEBRUARY 6, 1993





BLACK TENNIS HALL OF FAME CLASS OF 2021 NOMINATIONS ARE NOW OPEN!!



ON TUESDAY, JUNE 16TH, HALL OF FAMER ROBERT RYLAND, THE FIRST BLACK TENNIS PROFESSIONAL IN AMERICA, CELEBRATED HIS 100TH BIRTHDAY

In 1959 Robert Ryland broke through barriers of race and class, and became the first African-American tennis professional. His success in both American Tennis Association (ATA), and integrated amateur tournaments around the country, made him one of the best known Black players in the United States.  In 2009, in honor of his lifetime of achievements, he was inducted into the Black Tennis Hall Fame (BTHOF). 


At the Class of 2019 Induction Ceremony, Mr. Ryland graced us with his presence at Brooklyn Borough Hall, Brooklyn New York, and shared a bit of his wisdom in person, as he shares it in his book.

"I THINK, IF I HAD NOT PLAYED TENNIS, I WOULD NEVER BECOME 99 YEARS OLD."


Robert Ryland 100 from Black Tennis Hall of Fame on Vimeo.

BLACK TENNIS HALL OF FAME PIONEER VIRGINIA M. GLASS HAS DIED


Virginia M. Glass was inducted into the Black Tennis Hall of Fame with the class of 2013 that also included John Harding Lucas, II, Bessie Stockard, Sydney Llewellyn, James "Jimmy" Smith, and Lucille Freeman.

In 1991, Glass made history by becoming the first female president of the American Tennis Association (ATA). She served as president for two two-year terms. In addition, Glass was the first woman of color to serve on the USTA executive committee. In 1969, she co-founded the Mountain View Tennis Club in San Diego, CA and was one of the original founders of the San Diego District Tennis Association. Glass’ long service with this influential organization included serving as president and at-large board member. She was also one of the original founders of the San Diego Umpires Association and served as a West Coast editor for Black Tennis Magazine. In 1988, Glass won the Women’s 60-and-over division of the International Tennis Federation Veterans Championship. In 2008, Glass received the “Lifetime Achievement Award” from the Southern California Tennis Association (SCTA) for her work with local tennis organizations and Community Development.

Glass served on the ATA’s junior development committee and as a board member of the Black Tennis & Sports Foundation. Over the last 70 plus years, she has volunteered at virtually every level of organized tennis both in the ATA and the USTA. In addition to her volunteer work, Glass was a very successful tennis parent who is the proud mother of Sidney and Luis Glass who were top junior players in the USTA Eastern Section. Sidney Glass played tennis at the University of Wisconsin and Luis Glass went on to be an All-American tennis player at UCLA. In 2010, Glass was inducted into the San Diego Tennis Hall of Fame.

Glass traveled an incredible road in life — from spending three years in World War II concentration camps in her native Philippines, where she lost her father and two sisters — to living in “America’s Finest City.”

Along the way, Glass developed a passion for tennis in all aspects — playing, coaching, running tournaments and working with many organizations associated with the sport.

“Being elected is an acknowledgement and recognition of the efforts I have made to opening up tennis to minorities.

“Our main emphasis with the club has always been on the development of junior players. The National Junior Tennis League (NJTL), inspired by the late tennis great Arthur Ashe, has been a huge help to our efforts.”

Ms. Glass died on Thursday, April 16th.




FORMER AMERICAN TENNIS ASSOCIATION EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR ALBERT A. TUCKER HAS DIED


Albert A. Tucker served as Vice President of Multicultural Business Development for the Greater Fort Lauderdale Convention & Visitors Bureau (GFLCVB), where he was focused on ensuring that organizations and families of diverse backgrounds select Greater Fort Lauderdale as the destination of choice for conferences and family reunions. It was Tucker’s vision to expose ethnically diverse individuals and groups to Greater Fort Lauderdale so that GFL becomes the destination of choice for individuals of color.

Mr. Tucker had been the leader in the development of a Permanent Home and Training Facility for the American Tennis Association where he formerly served as Executive Director.

In addition to his public service, Mr. Tucker served on the Advisory Board of the Urban League of Broward County, Advisory Board of the 100 Black Men of Greater Fort Lauderdale and was intimately involved with the expansion of Jazz in the Gardens musical festival, which brings in more than 45,000 visitors to South Florida
.
 

WPLG Local 10 News stated that Mr. Tucker died suddenly this weekend. His co-workers said his death was not related to the coronavirus.  A video is posted detailing the work and community appreciation for Mr. Tucker.


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